The Punning Music Teacher Explains Some Country Songs

Country music has enjoyed explosive success for many decades, and no music class would be complete without recognizing some of country’s greatest stars. The category covers such a wide variety of human emotions and experiences that today, Class, we will concentrate on only a few singers who kept their topics in light, funny or off-beat modes. One of the most prolific writers and singers of country music is also one of the oldest; Willie Nelson, age 87, is still one of the most recognizable talents because of his versatility in…

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Never Underestimate What a Teenager Might Say or Do, Part 1

Being well into a teaching career and/or being a parent to a teenager can amount to a whole new learning experience for those who think they know a great deal about young people.  After all, we were their ages once, correct? We tend to forget much about how the teenage mind operates, plus we underestimate how much life has changed from one generation to the next. Volumes have been written by teachers or others who work with young people. There are nostalgic, heart-warming and surprising insights that teachers can recount…

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Kyle McKee: Remembering a Man of Honor, Intergrity

Heavy hearts were the norm as residents of the Riverside School District learned that a new brick would be added posthumously to honor a man in its Veterans’ Wall of Honor. Kyle McKee, Class of 2003, was killed in the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt during a peace-keeping operation on Nov. 12, 2020. Kyle, 35, had been a staff sergeant and crewman on board a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter when it encountered mechanical problems that took the lives of four other Americans, a Frenchman and a Czech service member. All were…

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Arlington National Cemetery: Site of an RHS-Inspired Memorial

It has been more than two decades since a Riverside High School teacher and her class initiated the creation of a military memorial that has its own site at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Since the Log’s editors felt many alumni might not be aware of the memorial, perhaps it is time for a review of how it came to be. In the late 1990s, art teacher Dr. Mary Porter and a group of her students were deeply saddened when they saw a video of an American soldier’s body…

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The Way Paper Work Usta Was

Before I launch into a rant about how things were years ago, the above title is partially based upon the mangled diction that comedian Jeff Foxworthy often used. He has been referred to as  “The King of Redneck Jokesters,” and in many ways, he represents the way comedians usta was – politically incorrect, glib and masterful in his stage presentation. Paper work in all its forms has undergone huge transformations in past decades so that now there are few similarities to how it usta was done. Both the production and…

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A Painesville Legend Remembered

Ronald Balogh, 73, died August 14 following a two-month illness. He had been under hospice care near his snowbird home in Estero, Florida. Ron left behind a 50-year legacy of service to his hometown, especially to the Painesville City schools, that earned him the commonly used moniker of “Mr. Painesville.” Ron was a devoted teacher and administrator at Harvey High School, where he taught instrumental music and led the school’s band, then became a guidance counselor and served as assistant principal for several years before his retirement. Respected and loved…

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Farmer Leroy

Way back in time, not long after Leroy Elementary School was built, one of the farmers in Leroy Township happened to have a coincidental name: Leroy Furrow. He was so enterprising, ambitious and knowledgeable about agriculture and animal husbandry that he became a mentor to many successive residents. He could rightly be called the Father of Leroy Farming. Unfortunately, over time, students from the other townships in the Riverside School district took pleasure in teasing Leroy students, good-naturedly, of course, about Leroy Township’s  backward country ways. A bit of biographical…

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The Music Teacher Punning, Part One

Good morning, music- loving students. Today we will have a music history lesson that will instruct you in how music’s origin is not always straightforward. It is more complex than having a composer simply sit down and transfer lyrics and symbols onto a page. Many well-known musical compositions have a convoluted story behind them that one would hardly suspect. We will begin with some older compositions and work our way through to some wonderful music of the second half of the 20th century. Part I – Classics of America from…

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RHS Seniors Pre-graduation Send-Off

A pre-graduation celebration parade unlike any other in Riverside’s history was organized for Friday evening, June 12. Spearheaded by   Jaime McIntyre, senior class advisor, the school parking lot was colorful, noisy with horn-honking and full of cheering, smiling people. The event was designed to be a prelude to the socially- distanced walk across the stage as seniors receive their diplomas. Although few RHS seniors are likely to be thinking now about the far distant future, their graduation ceremonies will probably be topics of conversation for generations of their families…

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The Biology Teacher Punning – Unit II: Birds

Class, today we will begin a unit about birds, one of the most numerous and easily recognized categories of animals. The study of birds is called ornithology. John James Audubon has been known as America’s most authoritative bird expert. People enthusiastic about birds used to be called “bird watchers,” but recently “birders” has become the more common term. An exception to the spelling and pronunciation of the term can be heard in New York City, where one can see “boiders” in Central Park. One lesson birders should remember before craning their…

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